Tuesday, October 16, 2012

Honey and Oat Gluten Free Bread

Honey and Oat Gluten Free Bread recipe by Barefeet In The Kitchen

Soft, fluffy and perfectly slice-able sandwich bread with a rich flavor from oat flour and honey. After a few months of making and very much enjoying soft and fluffy gluten free sandwich bread, I missed the deeper flavors that are typical in whole wheat sandwich bread. So, I started playing with the recipe. (The original is closer in flavor to a traditional light wheat or white sandwich bread.)

I've made this recipe at least five times now and I am very excited to finally share it. This bread is perfect for sandwiches, toast or as a snack on it's own. It was also a hit served with soup and chili.

* If you enjoy step by step photos, there are photos included in my original Gluten Free Sandwich Bread post. This dough appears the same in each stage and the photos can be used for reference.

If you are not in need of Gluten Free bread, I recommend trying one of the following:
Unbelievably Easy Brioche

Honey and Oat Gluten Free Bread

1 cups brown rice flour
1 1/4 cups oat flour (make sure the flour is certified GF)
2/3 cup potato starch
1/3 cup tapioca starch
2 teaspoons instant yeast
1 1/4 teaspoons salt
1 1/4 teaspoons xanthan gum
3/4 cup warm milk
1/3 cup honey
1/4 cup soft butter
3 large eggs
Optional: sprinkle of oats for the top (make sure the oats are certified GF)

Place the flours, starch, yeast, salt and xantham gum in a mixing bowl, or the bowl of your stand mixer. Warm the butter and honey in a glass bowl or cup until the butter is melted. Whisk or stir it together and set aside. Using an electric mixer (hand mixer, or stand), gradually beat the warm milk into the dry ingredients. The mixture will be crumbly at first, but once all the milk is added, it’ll come together. Add the melted butter and honey to the mixing bowl and beat until thoroughly blended.

Add the eggs, one at a time. Beat the mixture till each egg is thoroughly integrated before adding the next one. Once you’ve added all the eggs, beat the mixture at high speed for 3 minutes. This adds air to the thick batter, which helps take the place of the missing gluten as far as structure is concerned.

At the end of 3 minutes, the batter will look like thick, heavy buttercream icing: smooth and silky. The dough will also be very sticky, and feel a bit gritty if you rub some between your fingers. Leave the batter right in the mixing bowl and cover the bowl with a light cloth or plastic wrap. Let the thick batter rise for 60-90 minutes. This batter won’t double in size, but it’ll definitely puff up.

Gently stir the batter down. Scrape it into a lightly greased 8 1/2” x 4 1/2” loaf pan. Use your wet fingers, or a wet spatula or bowl scraper, to smooth the top, eliminating any “wrinkles.” The smoother your loaf is before you put it into the oven, the smoother it’ll be once it’s baked. Lightly sprinkle the top of the loaf with oats and press lightly into the loaf.

Loosely cover the pan and let the dough rise till it barely crowns over the rim of the pan. 45 – 60 minutes, as much as 90. Towards the end of the rising time, preheat the oven to 350°F.

Bake the bread for 25 minutes, until golden brown. Remove it from the oven, and turn it out of the pan onto a rack. Lightly brush with melted butter to help keep the crust soft, being careful not to brush off the sprinkling of oats. Slice when completely cool. Enjoy!

Honey and Oat Gluten Free Bread recipe by Barefeet In The Kitchen


 

79 comments:

  1. Wow, that bread looks absolutely perfect, Mary! I bet the house smelled amazing while it baked too!

    ReplyDelete
  2. This bread looks so soft and delicious! Wow!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Yay for gluten free bread! I can eat gluten but so many of my friends cant. I look forward to making this for them. Thank you for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  4. This is such a cute little loaf, and I never think of homemade bread as being so sliceable. I am on the verge of making some bread for my husband, it will be my first foray into bread making in a long while, wish me luck! I'm going to check out your easy brioche!

    ReplyDelete
  5. It looks amazingly delicious!

    ReplyDelete
  6. One of the ladies in my art class has celiac and bemoans no bread...this will be such a treat for her!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I have a friend that was just telling me recently that she was having such a hard time trying to find a decent tasting gluten free bread. I know she will be thrilled with this recipe!

    ReplyDelete
  8. my gluten free breads have never turned out. I'm excited to try yours!!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Pillow bread! Haha. My dauhters will really be thrilled with this.

    ReplyDelete
  10. And I thought your gluten free sandwich bread was good. Made this today and even though I had to sub tapioca for potato starch due to a wicked potato starch accident caused by a 5 yr old and energetic dogs it was amazing the texture the moisture can't say enough!!

    ReplyDelete
  11. This bread is amazing! I have Hashimoto's so I need to go gluten free. It's been so hard because I love bread. I've tried a few other bread recipes and they are just too yeast-y. I almost cried when I tried this bread...now I can go gluten free and still have sandwiches that taste good. My husband loved it too and said he would go gluten free with me if I made this bread :) THANK YOU!

    ReplyDelete
  12. This looks awesome. I make several gf breads, but still have not been completely satisfied. Have you used coconut oil instead of butter? We dont usually use butter and wanted to substituted the coconut oil. I wasn't sure of the exact ratio to substitute. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You could try a 1:1 substitution with the oils. Please let me know how it works for you, if you do do try it! Good luck.

      Delete
  13. Made this last night for my girl's lunch today. It came out fantastic ( just a little pudgier because I used a larger loaf pan then in the recipe). It tasted delicious. This is the best gluten free sandwich bread recipe I have every tried. Thank You so much for posting it.

    ReplyDelete
  14. This tastes really great, but I can't get mine to rise high enough or top the rim of the pan. Yeast is good, and I put in an only-slightly warmed oven at about 82 degrees to rise. I have made this twice now and both times it failed to rise very much. Any ideas why?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's hard to guess on something like that, CJ. My first thought was the yeast, but if that isn't it, I'm not sure. Is the finished loaf dense? Is it possible your pans are a bit larger than mine and it is rising fully, but just not over the top because of the size? Good luck with it. I'm glad the bread has been tasty for you though.

      Delete
    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    3. Maybe your milk is too hot and it's killing the yeast??

      Delete
  15. do you think you could sub agave nectar for the xantham gum?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've never seen that used as a substitute for a gum. I do not think it would work the same way. Guar gum could be substituted, but I don't think that agave nectar would do anything to hold the bread together. Without the xantham, it tends to be a lot more crumbly.

      Delete
  16. do you think you could sub agave nectar for the xantham gum?

    ReplyDelete
  17. Would this recipe still work well without the first rise (in the bowl)? I have made various loafs of gluten free bread before (with varying levels of success). Most recipes don't seem to call for that first rise, so was wondering if this would still work well if I only did one rise (in the pan, before baking)?

    Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am guessing not, because the dough is still very wet after the first rise. If you decide to try it that way, let me know how it turns out. I'm always interested in finding ways to make like easier in the kitchen.

      Delete
  18. Best gluten free bread recipe I've come across so far! The loaf was beautiful, just like in the picture, and it tasted great. I had to add about another quarter to half cup of milk (I used soy milk) to get to the consistencies described in the instructions--perhaps because of different brands of flour? In any case, it came out perfectly. I did everything else exactly the same including temp and time. A note for others: Mixing the dough with a hand-mixer was a bit of a struggle as the dough kept climbing the beaters and I had to stop multiple times to de-gum them. However, I got through it and it was well worth the effort. Thanks so much!

    ReplyDelete
  19. Oh. My. Goodness. The first bite of this bread was heavenly. The honey oat flavor was reminiscent of the best "normal" bread I remember from my pre-GF days. It turned out perfectly, despite my error in letting it rise too long in the pan (it overflowed). I simply scraped it up and plopped it into a new pan, let it rise again, then baked. Just one question...the slices are moist, but break very easily. Is this normal for this recipe, or is it because of the extra rise? Thanks so much and I can't wait to make this again and share it with all my GF friends!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I let a loaf rise too much and it overflowed the pan earlier this week. I noticed after it baked that it seemed a bit more "airy" (?) than usual and the pieces did break more easily after a few days. I don't usually have trouble with it crumbling though. (Wow, how's that for a jumbled answer?) Maybe try cutting the slices a little bit thicker next time? If they get too thin, they will break.

      Delete
  20. could i use a paddle in a stand mixer instead of a hand mixer?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, absolutely. I use my stand mixer to make this bread. It is much easier than with a hand mixer. Good luck!

      Delete
  21. Can I use white rice flour instead of brown?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, white rice and brown rice flour can be used interchangeably. Good luck!

      Delete
  22. This is absolutely the best gluten free bread recipe I have tried. We were first impressed with your white sandwich bread, but after trying this recipe, it has become my family's favorite. My husband says it is the first bread that you can't even tell it is gluten free. Thanks so much for sharing this wonderful recipe.

    One question I do have. The first time I made it, it turned out great. The last two times I made it, the loaf had a hole in the middle and the dough was uncooked around that hole. I even tried baking it longer and that didn't seem to make a difference the second time. Do you think I might need to add more liquid like someone else suggested in a comment above? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oddly enough, Ellie, after making this bread countless times, that happened to me too, the last time I made it! I assumed that I hadn't baked it long enough, because I was distracted at the time. I wonder if it was the weather? (It was cold and rainy, a very uncommon thing in my area.) I'm making it again tomorrow. I'll let you know how it turns out. Thanks for the update!

      Delete
    2. I have made this several times again and adding a 1/4 - 1/2 cup extra of milk (almond milk in my case) as someone else said they did to get the right consistency made the difference and it turned out perfect again. Thanks for this wonderful recipe!!

      Delete
  23. I may be the only one to mention this and I'm really not trying to be a Debbie Downer... but...

    I clicked on this recipe assuming that the bread mimicked the flavour of oats - not that it actually contained them. As fantastic as this bread may be, please please PLEASE do not feed it to your friends if they have Celiac's Disease without explaining the ingredients to them first.

    I have Celiac's and this bread would make me very very sick. Oats contain gluten.

    There are a few who are able to tolerate oats in very small doses, but they must come from wheat-free facility.

    I only mention this because I noted that there were several comments to the effect that people were going to make this for the friends with Celiacs and I didn't want to you to accidentally feed your friends something that made them very sick. I'm sure that those who have slight intolerances or those who go gluten free for health reasons will be perfectly fine with this bread - I'm only referring to those who have Celiacs.

    Just make sure to ask them if they can have oats, and if they can, be sure to buy a wheat-free variety - Bobs Red Mills, for example.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I only buy certified GF oats (i.e. Bob's Red Mill) when baking for Celiac or highly gluten intolerant persons. Thanks for the reminder though. I will make a note in the recipe. Thank you!

      Delete
    2. Thanks for adding that to your recipe. I wouldn't have said anything except that I had read the comments and got a little worried.

      This may sound like an odd question, but are you located in the US? Labeling laws (I think) are a little less strict there. In Canada, at least last I checked, Bob's Red Mills could only label their oat products "wheat free" (meaning made in a wheat-free facility) and not gluten free.

      The reason is that oats naturally contain gluten - it's just that it's at a lower toxicity level for someone who has Celiacs. There are some who can tolerate them and others that can't (like me).

      If you notice that your son is still showing signs of being uncomfortable (is he Celiac or just intolerant?) I would try cutting out oats to see if he improves.

      I've known I was Celiac since I was a baby, long before they found out that it was more common that originally thought, so I've had a long time to learn about my disease. I've noticed, nowadays, now that there is a trend of going gluten free to be healthier, that lots of company label their products accordingly. Some are more diligent than others and you have to be careful of the ones where it's more deceiving. I remember picking up a cereal from Nature's Path cereal, for example. On the front, it boasts "gluten free" in large bold letters, but when I flipped it over and read the ingredients, it says "may contain wheat". That's just an example of how relaxed labeling laws are.

      Delete
    3. http://www.celiac.com/categories/Miscellaneous-Information-on-Celiac-Disease/Gluten%252dFree-Food-Ingredient-Labeling-Regulations/

      That's a link that talks about it a little further.

      In Canada, now, they are required to list major allergens, such as gluten, so even if a product claims to be gluten free, you can still flip it over and read the ingredients to be sure.

      Unfortunately, the US has not progressed that far yet.

      Okay, I'm going to stop talking before you think I'm trying to be a know-it-all, which I'm not - I swear :-) I just thought it might help with your son.

      Delete
    4. Sorry - 1 last thing. I was on the Bob's Red Mills website and in their FAQ's, it states that the Canadian Celiac board and Health Canada release the statement that there is a "safe" level for people with Celiacs, in terms of eating their uncontaminated oats. For children, that maximum is equal to .25 cups (20-25 gram max) of their oat products per day before the toxicity level rises to a point where they can get sick.

      I hope this info is helpful. Now I promise to stop talking for real this time LOL

      Delete
    5. Your comments are helpful, thanks for coming back and leaving more information. I am in the U.S. and I have heard that the standards for labeling are more relaxed here. Luckily, my son hasn't been diagnosed with Celiac, he simply doesn't tolerate wheat very well. At this point he has no difficulty with oats at all, but I will keep this in mind if that changes. Thank you!

      Delete
  24. This was AMAZING! My husband was so happy to have a peanut butter and jelly sandwich after 3 months of not being able to find a good gluten free bread.

    It was a little dense - wondering if there is an adjustment for high altitude? Is that possible with gluten free baking? We are new to this, and SO happy to have found your site!

    Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not sure about an adjustment for high altitude. Let me research it a bit and I'll get back to you. I am so glad that your husband enjoyed the bread, even though it was a little dense for you! You might try letting it rise a little bit longer next time and see if that helps it.

      Delete
  25. Looks great. Alas, my son can't have oats, GF or not. Any recommendation for flour substitutions? Such as millet, almond, teff, sorghum, amaranth, spelt, garbanzo, etc.? Thanks a lot!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I also make this bread (without any oats at all) and it has been well reviewed by a number of people as well. http://barefeetinthekitchen.blogspot.com/2012/08/tender-high-rising-gluten-free-sandwich.html

      Substituting another grain should work as well, provided you substitute by weight and not only by volume. Good luck!

      Delete
  26. Has anyone ever tried mixing this bread or your sandwich bread in a bread machine and setting it for dough and than taking it out and baking it in the oven.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. On this bread recipe: http://barefeetinthekitchen.blogspot.com/2012/08/tender-high-rising-gluten-free-sandwich.html there are several comments from people that used machines. A couple people mentioned having GF cycles on the machine and another person adjusted her traditional machine for this bread. Hopefully those comments will help you.

      If you do try it, please let me know how it works for you!

      Delete
    2. I haven't tried it in the bread machine yet. I probably will. I have read the comments on the other page. I did go ahead and make this bread today with the kitchenaide. I had to add the extra 1/2 cup of milk. I made the regular gluten free bread yesterday so knew what it should be like at this stage and it was just crumby, even after adding the extra 1/4 cup, so I went ahead and added another 1/4 cup. It still wasn't quite as together as the regular bread at this stage, but I went with it and finished the recipe. I perhaps let it raise a little high, but it turned out great. I am so happy with both of these recipes, I have already passed them on.

      Delete
    3. I made this bread for the 3rd time today and it turned out great like usual. This time, I wanted to make 2 loaves at the same time, so made one in the bread machine. I did it while doing the one in the kitchenaide and did it like the recipe has you do it. I put in the dry, turned it on, slowly added the warm milk (I have to add an extra 1/2 cup milk), than added the honey/butter and than the eggs one at a time, than let it mix for 6 or 7 minutes (I upped it cause it doesn't appear to mix as well as the kitchenaide) I turned it off and let it raise, after which I ended up putting it in the kitchenaide to mix another 2 minutes cause it had alot of lumps that the other loaf didn't have. I than put it in the bread pan to raise and it turned out pretty much like the kitchenaide loaf even though I messed with it a bit more than I was supposed to. Don't think I would do it in the bread machine again since it doesn't seem to mix out the lumps very well. Just thought I would let you know I tried it.

      Delete
  27. Great looking GF bread. I have to try this recipe.

    ReplyDelete
  28. I just made this bread and something went terribly wrong. My batter was never thicker then pancake batter. It raised nicely in the bowl and again in the loaf pan. But the batter was rather thin. I let it raise to the top of the pan and then placed it in a preheated oven. Shortly after it rose more and batter started to drip over the edge. after 25 minutes the top had collapsed into the middle and the batter underneath was still raw. First thing is I likely let it rise to much. But the consistency was much thinner then other gf breads batter. Any thoughts??? I left it in the oven for another 25 minutes to see if the doughy part will bake. It smells yummy just wish it looked better. Any suggestions will be helpful! Thanks

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm so sorry that the recipe didn't work for you. The dough should have been pretty thick. Definitely not pourable. Letting it rise too much can contribute to a bread that doesn't cook right, but it sounds like something was off in the recipe. Any substitutions maybe? Or possibly an ingredient was missed inadvertently?

      If you try it again and the batter is still runny, I'd add a bit more flour and starch. However, without seeing the dough, I'm hesitant to tell you how much. The weather can affect breads quite a bit, but I've never seen a dough become that runny. Let me know how it works next time!

      Delete
  29. Can I use arrowroot powder, in place of the potato and tapioca starches?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't think it would work the same way, but it might be worth a shot. I haven't tried it myself. If you do try it, let me know how it works!

      Delete
  30. Can I make it without the potato starch? or is there a substitute?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can use tapioca starch or cornstarch, but it will have a slightly different texture. It should still work fine though!

      Delete
    2. Great thanks!

      Delete
  31. LOVE this bread! It was my first time trying GF bread and I don't even think I'll need to try another recipe. My entire family loved it! Thanks for sharing! I would like to make it without butter though- I saw someone posted earlier about using coconut oil in place of the butter. Has anyone had success with that? Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am so glad that your family loved the bread! I have not tried making it without butter myself. If you do try it, please let me know how it turns out!

      Delete
  32. Thanks you for this recipe. Can I sub additional oat flour for the rice flour? I have an allergy to wheat AND rice!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Additional oat flour would probably work fine, although I think the loaf will be a bit heavier than the original. You might try subbing sorghum flour for the brown rice flour as well. Good luck! Let me know how it works out for you.

      Delete
  33. Lovely bread. Looks soft and yummy.

    ReplyDelete
  34. Have you tried using sourdough as your yeast? If so how much would you suggest? I have a fantastic rye starter we have been using with no side effects.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have never tried it, but I would LOVE to hear how it worked for you, if you figure it out. Making my own sourdough bread is on my list of things I would really like to figure out this year!

      Delete
  35. I just made this and it's DELICIOUS! Thank you!

    Only problem for me is that when I calculated the calories mine came in a whopping 156 calories per slice (I got 18 slices out of the loaf), which is just something for me to keep in mind since I'm trying to lose weight.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am thrilled that you like the bread, Miriam. Unfortunately, GF flours and starches do tend to be higher in calories than plain AP flour.

      Delete
  36. Mary, I just want to thank you for this amazingly delicious bread! I recently had to go gluten free and I am a baker and a cook and mourned all I would have to give up making and eating. I was so thrilled to find your recipes and my whole family and Iloved, loved this bread! They are not so afraid of me being gluten free now. I've printed up a bunch of your recipes and can't wait to try them! I made the Buttermilk Biscuits tonight and they were amazing too! Thanks again.

    ReplyDelete
  37. I made this bread a couple of days ago and it was AWESOME. I only had a large bread pan so I didn't get the lovely rounded top that yours has but the flavor and consistency was wheat bread quality. I loved it so much I made it again today. I increased the recipe to 1.5 and it fit in my large pan perfectly. Such a great recipe. Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  38. Oh my golly, this bread is delicious! I had to do a substitution because of dietary intolerances (used arrowroot in place of tapioca starch) but it worked out beautifully. This is *the* gluten-free bread I've been longing for. And it works in a normal size bread loaf pan! (Didn't have to buy something special.)

    Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Just an update. Today I made it with all potato starch instead of part potato and part tapioca (or arrowroot). Today's resulted in a more "normal" bread taste. The arrowroot starch that I tried previously gave it an odd taste, though not bad. Just different.

      Delete
  39. Hello Miss Mary! This is the perfect recipe for me and I'll definitely try this at home. I was looking for something new for my kids who always go to school and I'm always sending them delicious and nutritious snacks so they won't buy anywhere if they were hungry. Thank you for sharing this Miss Mary!
    xoxo cakes bakery in Brooklyn

    ReplyDelete
  40. Any idea about nutrition information?

    ReplyDelete
  41. Here's a little tip I ran across that has me putting in more potato starch than tapioca starch as Mary's recipe calls for. Using tapioca starch alone give gummy results; potato starch alone give a fairly dry, crumby result. I've seen numerous GF cooks advice going half and half with these starches, but for our taste we like the lift and lightness that more potato starch gives to the bread. Tapioca flour in combination with potato starch adds a good chew and nice crumb.

    My 2 cents.

    I'm going to substitute sorghum for the brown rice and a flax seed/water goo for the eggs. I'll post the results.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've played with it myself in countless different ways. I'm pretty happy with this combination, but I'll try reversing it next time and see what we think! Thanks for the tips, Ruthie.

      Delete
  42. I wish people would stop posting these amazing delicious gluten free recipes because my wife keeps making them for the gluten free members of the family and doesn't make regular bread anymore.
    I miss my homemade specialty breads she used to make.
    In all seriousness though this one is amazing but I'm not allowed to eat it.

    famished and disgruntled husband.

    ReplyDelete
  43. Tried this today. Forgot to buy tapioca starch and used tapioca instead. Still was marvelous. Beats the frozen rudi/udi stuff - I'm so excited! Thanks for a great recipe.

    ReplyDelete
  44. I tried your bread several times. It tastes very good. However I always have large tunnels in my loaf

    ReplyDelete
  45. Can I find potato starch or tapioca starch at Walmart or Meijer or do I need to go somewhere special? I have cornstarch but I really want my bread to turn out just like yours!! :)

    ReplyDelete
  46. This was THE BEST tasting gluten free bread EVER!! The store bought versions are short of flavor and all seem to be super dense, super dry breads. My family would not eat the stuff. This smelled like "real" bread the second I mixed the wet ingredients with the dry! And, the taste did not disappoint! We'll be making this regularly!

    ReplyDelete